STATIONS of the CROSS

with Thoughts from

ST. PAUL of the CROSS

First Station: Jesus is condemned to Death

“It is necessary that we accept the cross of tribulation willingly, at least with the higher part of our soul, as Jesus accepted His condemnation in perfect conformity to the will of the Father”

Prayer: O Jesus! so meek and uncomplaining, teach me resignation in trials.

One Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be…

Second Station: Jesus Carries His Cross

“Most fortunate is the soul who walks by the way of Calvary, following Jesus our Redeemer, for if we suffer with Christ now with Christ we shall reign in the glory of the Father.”

 My Jesus, this cross should be mine, not Thine; my sins crucified Thee.

Third Station: Jesus Falls for the First Time

“Come and see our Savior enduring so much suffering, so many insults, and oppressed with the heavy burden of the cross, for love of us. Contemplate the Son of God, Redeemer of the world, and how much He is suffering. O Jesus in Your sufferings I see the gravity of my sins. Lord have mercy!”

O Jesus! by the first fall, never let me fall into mortal sin.

Fourth Station: Jesus Meets His Mother

“The Sorrowful Mother seeks her Divine Son, Jesus; she meets him on the way to Calvary; she sees Him bound, crowned with thorns, with the cross on his shoulders. O Queen of Martyrs, we also have been your sorrow that, like a sharp and unrelenting sword has pierced your soul.”

O Jesus! may no human tie, however dear, keep me from following the road of the Cross.

Fifth Station: Simon Helps Jesus Carry His Cross

“Those who suffer tribulations, suffering, persecutions, and are despised for the love of God are helping Jesus Christ carry His cross. If they persevere, they will be partakers of His glory in heaven.”

Simon unwillingly assisted Thee; may I, with patience, suffer all for Thee

Sixth Station: Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus

“The remembrance of the most holy Passion of Jesus Christ is the door through which the soul enters into intimate union with God, interior recollection and most sublime contemplation. It must be impressed deeply on our souls as we allow ourselves to be immersed in His bitter sufferings, for through these the love of God is enkindled in us and we will then be plunged in the abyss of the divinity.”

O Jesus! Thou didst imprint Thy Sacred features upon Veronica’s veil; stamp them also indelibly upon my heart.

Seventh Station: Jesus Falls for the Second Time

“The greater number of Christians live unmindful of all that Jesus, our Life, has done and suffered. That is why they live on, sleeping in the night of iniquity.”

By the second fall, preserve me, dear Lord, from relapse into sin.

Eighth Station: Jesus Consoles the Women of Jerusalem

“The most holy Passion of Jesus Christ is the most efficacious means to convert obstinate sinners, because meditation on the sufferings of our Savior has power to root out vice and implant love and holy fear of God in the soul.”

My greatest consolation would be to hear Thee say: “Many sins are forgiven thee, because thou hast loved much.”

Ninth Station: Jesus Falls for the Third Time

“Let us be glad when we are afflicted and the cross is most heavy on our shoulders, because then if we suffer with the patience of Christ we will begin to be His disciples.”

O Jesus! When weary upon life’s long journey, be Thou my strength and perseverance.

Tenth Station: Jesus is Stripped of His Garments

“Jesus permitted Himself to be despoiled of His garments on Calvary in order to teach us to renounce our own will when it is not conformable to the will of the Father. He wants us to strip ourselves of earthly affections and all inordinate love of the things of this world, so that we may clothe ourselves with the virtues of Christ.”

My soul has been robbed of its robe of innocence; clothe me, dear Jesus, with the garb of penance and contrition.

Eleventh Station: Jesus is Nailed to the Cross

“We must glory in nothing else but in being crucified with Jesus and in bearing the marks of His wounds in our body. We must strive for great detachment from creatures in order to be united only with the Creator, through the various sufferings and pains of life, endured for the love of God, in patience, silence in the midst of all the sacrifices demanded by our state in life, and by practicing the virtues taught by our Divine Savior.”

Thou didst forgive Thy enemies;my God, teach me to forgive injuries and FORGET them.

Twelfth Station: Jesus Dies on the Cross

“Jesus died to give us life: all creatures are in sorrow: the sun is darkened, the earth trembles, the rocks split, the veil of the temple is rent; will only our heart remain harder than the rock? Let us be immersed in a sea of sorrow over the death of Jesus and let us say to Him: “Lord, we thank you for having died on the cross for our sins.””

Thou art dying, my Jesus, but thy Sacred Heart still throbs with love for Thy sinful children.

Thirteenth Station: Jesus is Taken Down from the Cross

“If we go to the crucifix, we find our Mother of Sorrows, for where the Mother is, there also is the Son. Dear Mother, what sorrow you experienced in receiving your dead Son into your arms! We beseech you, Holy Mother, grant that the Passion of our Lord may be for us a fountain of sorrow, of pardon, of love and of life.”

Receive me into Thy arms, O Sorrowful Mother; and obtain for me perfect contrition for my sins.

Fourteenth Station: Jesus is Laid in the Tomb

“Devotion to the Passion of Jesus is the easiest way to be saved. The crucifix is a book wherein we learn every virtue, we learn the science of the saints, and therein we find all.”

When I receive Thee into my heart in Holy Communion, O Jesus, make it a fit abiding place for Thy adorable Body.


A brief guide to meditation on Jesus’ Passion by St. Paul of the Cross

The spiritual master provides four thought-provoking questions

that help a person dive deeper into Jesus’ Passion.

St. Paul of the Cross, a holy priest of the 18th century, was deeply devoted to the Passion of Jesus Christ during his lifetime. He possessed a deep spiritual life, which can clearly be seen in his many letters. St. Paul took what he received from God and distributed it generously to anyone who would listen.

             In particular, St. Paul gave a few helpful tips on how to meditate on Jesus’ Passion. He provides thought-provoking questions that dig deep into the soul and give a person ample material to meditate on.

 

 •   Retire, if possible, to some place where you can pray in silence and recollection. Kneel down and recollect yourself in the presence of God; adore His infinite majesty; humble yourself before Him; beg pardon for your sins; implore His grace, saying some prayer like the following:

 

 •   Grant me, O Lord, through Thy bitter Passion and death, the grace to know and love Thy infinite goodness; to thank Thee and have compassion for Thee for Thy sufferings in my behalf. Awaken in me a lively sorrow for my sins and help me for the future to do Thy holy will.

 

 •   Now read or recall to mind some part of the Passion on which you wish to meditate, such as the agony of Our Lord in the garden, the crowning with thorns, the scourging, or the crucifixion.

 

 •   Consider, then, Our Lord’s sufferings, comprising them under the following simple questions:

 

 •   Who is it that suffers? (That He is God —Lord of all, Creator of all, God incarnate, Redeemer, infinitely perfect, good, kind, just, loving, etc.)

 

 •   What does He suffer? (Consider the cruelty, shamefulness, length, excess of suffering, etc., and make repeated acts of regret, sorrow, compassion, etc.)

 

 •   Why does He suffer? (Reflect that it is not for His own sake, but for men, His creatures, for sinners especially, and therefore for you in particular.)

 

 •   How does He suffer? (Consider how, or in what manner, Jesus suffers. Reflect on the special virtues of which He gives you an example: His meekness, silence, obedience, patience, etc. ; and see how you can imitate Him, or receive encouragement from Him.)

 

 •   Dwell for some time on each one of these points.

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